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Unread postPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2005 2:19 pm 
Great suggestions guys, i reckon we should bombard are governement leaders about this prospects as they are a sure hit.

I am from Lanuza and i am very proud and appreciative of our LGU's initiative in stamping our town as the next Surfing haven for wave lovers alike both locals and foriegners.

I must admit the ongoing problem up north (90) is somewhat bothersome,
i really hope our politicians would exert an extra effort in halting this dilemma once and for all as this has been reccuring for decades now.


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Unread postPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2005 9:31 pm 
I know two current Mayors (Lanuza and Cortes, Surigao del Sur) who are doing perfectly their jobs as local executives, yet perfectly protecting the vast richness of their natural resources both terrestrial and marine. They both led the anti-mining and anti-logging operations in Surigao del sur especially CARCANMADCARLAN area. Sad to say they are both on their last terms. The point is, not all local executives in Mindanao are corrupt and inefficient. I hope you can also spare time to visit there so you can see and savour the breeze of the sea while it embraces the forest. I know only two of this kind in Mindanao. The other one is in Sultan Kudarat, but already destroyed by rampant logging.

Anyway, if we cannot trust our local politicians, how much more the national leaders/agencies who are completely strangers and never ever knew our place? I have absolutely no trust with the DENR. There might have plenty of good and sincere people inside but what can they do if the system itself is 'b*lok'?

For me, biodiversity mining is still the best!


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Unread postPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2005 7:34 am 
on some points i agree with iamguru. mayor irrizari is on his last term and is doing well as an executive largely because this guy knows the value of community involvement. but, iamguru must've been referring to dennis yu because mayor pete trinidad of cortes is still on his first term.

if cortes plays its card right, it can soar to greater heights because trinidad has the good fortune of having planned the development of cortes (he being its former MPDO) and having to implement the same development plan now that he is its mayor. though having said that, i refuse to think about a management maxim that a planner and an implementEr must be different persons if effectiveness, not to mention efficiency, is to be achieved.

yes, cortes has a perfect shoreline, or so my friends told me. also, it has rich marine life. but a little birdie told me that the last "kadagatan festival" needed a lot of seasoning because it was a bit bland.

but knowing mayor trinidad, i know he'll look into this. :lol:


peace and love.


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Unread postPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2005 11:55 pm 
We'll it is just a matter of time before we bear the fruits of our LGU's initiatives, provided their 'successors' would continue what has been started.

Tourism is definitely the way to go, however everyone has to be supportive of the local government drives if we are to witness ala 'Phuket' or 'Bali' tourists hotsopts in our towns. These places did not start big and if they made it i am postive we could do it too. We just need to learn to love and value the tourist so they would keep on coming back and/or advertise through word of mouths.


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Unread postPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2005 11:56 pm 
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Anonymous wrote:
We'll it is just a matter of time before we bear the fruits of our LGU's initiatives, provided their 'successors' would continue what has been started.

Tourism is definitely the way to go, however everyone has to be supportive of the local government drives if we are to witness ala 'Phuket' or 'Bali' tourists hotsopts in our towns. These places did not start big and if they made it i am postive we could do it too. We just need to learn to love and value the tourist so they would keep on coming back and/or advertise through word of mouths.


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Unread postPosted: Tue May 03, 2005 5:39 pm 
The following are three statements from different civil society organisations in the Philippines, all registering in different ways their opposition to the continued state promotion of mining to the detriment of the Filipino people and the environment.

A Statement Calling for the Scrapping of the Philippine Mining Act of 1995 and the Rejection of the Mineral Action Plan of the Arroyo Government
NCCP Executive Committee
November 11, 2004


On March 3, 2005, the Philippine Mining Act of 1995 or Republic Act 7942 will have been in operation for ten years. One long decade of misery for indigenous peoples and communities gravely affected by the mining industry, which is, by and large, in the hands of foreign mining companies.

The Supreme Court ruled that the Financial and/or Technical Assistance Agreement (FTAA) provision of the Philippine Mining Act of 1995 is unconstitutional. However, the Arroyo government has appealed this ruling. Moreover, President Arroyo has issued Memorandum Circular No. 67, "Directing the Operationalization of the Mineral Action Plan for Mineral Resources Development", and Executive Order 270 and 270-A, "National Policy Agenda on Revitalizing Mining in the Philippines". These memos basically lay out the major policy guidelines to "revitalize" the mining industry by giving more economic and political privileges to mining companies.

The Mineral Action Plan (MAP) effectively amended the Implementing Rules and Regulations of the Mining Act to simplify and fast-track the procedures of processing mining applications and issuance of permits to mining companies. It also aims to harmonize conflicting laws towards the Mining Act and downgrade the authority of local government units.

The government has already set the MAP into motion, purportedly to help stave off the fiscal crisis. A concrete example is the operation of TVI Pacific Inc. in Siocon, Zamboanga del Norte who bulldozed the tip of Mt. Canatuan, home to Subanons, to extract gold even with widespread opposition of the people and without the permit of the local government. Mining permits have been granted in Eastern and Western Samar in spite of a moratorium on mining by the provincial governments. The continued operation and expansion of Lepanto Consolidated Mining Company even if the people of Mankayan, Benguet are united in opposition is another case.

These are dangerous developments. They show where the priorities of this present dispensation lie. The National Council of Churches in the Philippines (NCCP) affirms its stand against the liberalization of the country's mining industry by calling for the scrapping of the Philippine Mining Act of 1995. The Mining Act "has allowed the intensified extraction of our mineral resources endowed by the Almighty Creator"...and "violates the patrimony and sovereignty of the country with the expropriation of the people's land for foreign mining corporations and the 100% control of equity" ("Resolution on the Philippine Mining Act of 1995", NCCP Executive Committee, November 4, 1996). As such, the NCCP calls on its member churches and the general public to remain vigilant in pushing for the rejection of the MAP and to ensure that the Mining Act of 1995 is scrapped. We call on the Supreme Court to uphold the country's sovereignty and protect our national patrimony as it stands on its previous ruling regarding the unconstitutionality of the FTAA provision of the Mining Act.

We also call on our lawmakers to repeal this very destructive law. No amount of financial or fiscal crisis can justify the devastation of our God-given surroundings that is our legacy.

Let us support initiatives that will ensure a mining policy that is pro- people, and will protect the environment as well as push for the genuine development of the country. We have a responsibility to future generations.


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Open Letter to Secretary Mike Defensor of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR)

On the occasion of the Mining and Safety Week Celebration
Cordillera Peoples Alliance
November 16, 2004



On this occasion of Mining and Safety Week celebration of the government and the mining industry, we cannot be celebrating with you, as mine workers remain unsafe in their workplace, and mining -affected communities continue to suffer from the adverse impacts of mining operations here in the Cordillera and other parts of the country. Time and again, we’ve raised our voice in protest over the destruction of our land and water bodies due to large scale mining operation. Time and again, we urged the government to decisively address these issues as a matter of public accountability, recognition of the rights of indigenous communities and for the protection of the environment.


Yet our calls and legitimate demands have fallen on deaf ears. Until today, communities around the Agno river and the Abra river continue to suffer from serious pollution caused by past and present corporate mining operations. Until today, mined-out areas remain un-rehabilitate for the use of former communities and land owners. Till today, avoidable accidents and injuries of mine workers continue to happen. Till today, we indigenous peoples continue to be denied of our rights over our land and resources.


In spite of the serious impacts of large-scale mining, you have expressed your commitment to aggressively implement the Mineral Action Plan (MPA) for what you claim to be for responsible and sustainable mining. For us, this is a mere lip service and devoid of substance. The Mining Action Plan provides for the further weakening of legal procedures and mechanisms on environmental protection and democratic space for local government units and affected communities. Clearly, the MPA was designed based on the demands of mining companies for their unhampered and smooth operation, using additional foreign investment as a bait. The MPA signals a renewed effort of the government for the complete sell-out of the people mineral resources, sacrificing the rights and welfare of affected communities, and the protection of the environment in the process.


Mr. Secretary, we disagree with your position that massive corporate mining is a key solution to the financial crisis. The financial crisis was brought about by the government’s dependence on foreign debt and investment, on massive corruption and a distorted development framework which worsened the condition of the already impoverished majority of our people. Thus, the solution to this crisis should address comprehensively its root causes, and not by selling out our remaining resources to foreign investors.


Mr. Secretary, we urge you instead to address the past and present destruction caused by corporate mining operations, ensure the recognition of the democratic rights of affected communities and mine workers, and ensure strict implementation of environmental protection mechanisms which should include mandatory and direct accountability of mining companies over adverse impacts of their operations.


Sir, OUR RESOURCES ARE NOT FOR SALE! We shall defend them with all our might and power as a people! We challenge you to act on our demands as a public official, whose primary responsibility is to serve the people and not corporate greed and the interest of a few. Until then, any celebration of Mining and Safety Week is mere public image building for the discredited mining industry.


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Massive Forest Conversion Seen; Calls Made to Revoke Midnight Gozun Orders

Kalikasan-PNE Press Release
November 10, 2004


The Kalikasan People's Network for the Environment (Kalikasan-PNE) calls for the revocation of the midnight Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) administrative orders (DAO) signed by former environment DENR Secretary Elisea Gozun last August 31, 2004. A total of 28 DAOs were approved by Secretary Gozun, the highest number she approved in a day during her term.

"The former Secretary, in just a single day before bowing out of public office, practically declared 27,000 hectares of forest lands to be disposable and alienable. Not only will this lead to the denudation and destruction of our remaining forest ecosystem but also bring about the displacement of thousands of peasant and indigenous people residing in these areas," Clemente Bautista, KPNE national coordinator, said.

Bautista is referring to DAO Nos. 2004 37-50, all signed Aug. 31 by ex-DENR Sec. Gozun, which converts to agricultural (alienable and disposable) lands parts of forest lands in Cagayan, Benguet, Zamboanga del Sur, Cebu, Bataan, Bukidnon, Palawan, Surigao del Sur, Capiz, Pampanga and Nueva Ecija.

Aside from these, Gozun also signed DAO 2004-59 that reinforces the conversion of forest areas to agricultural and commercial uses. DAO 2004-59 allows the use and management of forest lands for "special uses" such as warehouse sites, shipbuilding, industrial processing, airports, log depot, lumberyard, mineral storage and/or quarrying, mine waste disposal area, motor pool, power station and other "lawful purposes.

"Converting these biodiversity-rich and environmentally critical areas to other uses facilitates the land grabbing and exploitation of big landlords, commercial loggers and transnational mining companies of the country's rich natural resources. Being a focal ecosystem, this shall lead to such environmental problems as frequent drought, massive soil erosion, depletion of our water resources and tragedies similar to the 1991 Ormoc and 2003 Southern Leyte flashfloods," Mr. Bautista added.

"We are certain that this form of environmental treason does not stop at former Sec. Gozun but can be traced all the way to President Arroyo. As part of her 10 point economic agenda, President Arroyo targets to develop two million hectares of new land for agribusiness and promised to further open up our mineral lands for foreign ownership and exploitation. These DAOs are necessary mechanisms for the administration to achieve its goal of commodifying and selling out our forest and natural resources to generate much needed dollar to address its fiscal deficit and cash strapped government," Mr. Bautista explained.


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Unread postPosted: Tue May 03, 2005 5:59 pm 
Philippine Mining Disaster: Counting the Cost of a Ruined River

In March 1996, the Philippines experienced one of its most serious industrial pollution accidents.

The incident involved the Marcopper Mining Corporation which has been carrying out open- pit copper mining since the 1970s.

When the company finished one of its operations in Marinduque, it plugged the old pit with concrete so that it could act as a disposal pond for mine waste. In August 1995, seepage was discovered in the pit's drainage tunnel. This subsequently ruptured. The accident discharged tailings into the Makulapnit-Boac (Boac) river system.

The incident resulted in the release of some 1.6 million cubic meters of tailings along 27 km of the river and the coastal areas near its mouth. The impact on the river and the people who depend on it for their livelihoods was massive. The onrush of tailings displaced river water which inundated low-lying areas, destroying crops and vegetable gardens and clogging irrigation channels to rice fields. The release left the Boac River virtually dead. The effects of the incident were so devastating that a UN assessment mission declared the accident to be a major environmental disaster.

Eugenia Bennagen and Ramyleo Pelayo, two researchers from the Resources, Environment and Economics Centre for Studies (REECS), set out to estimate the value of the environmental damage from the accident. One of their aims was to help formulate guidelines for damage assessment and the calculation of compensation.

Before the accident occurred, the waters of the Boac river provided many important services to the communities along its banks. These included fishing, irrigation, laundry, washing, bathing, transport and local medicines. Some of these services have market values, while others are not easily costed in this way.

To see how much damage the mining accident had caused, Ms. Bennagen and her team looked at the total value of the services the river provided, before and after the incident.

By interviewing households, they found that about two-thirds of the local population had been affected in various ways: rice farmers reported lower productivity, laundry women had to find new, less accessible sources of water, and so on.

The study's findings were dramatic: total damages from the disaster over a 10-year period were estimated at 170 million pesos (USD 7 million in 1996). The losses for 1996 alone (some 50 million pesos) were more than double the amount provided in compensation by the Marcopper Environmental Guarantee Fund (EGF). The EGF did not apply an economic valuation of damages and relied instead on a more ad hoc approach. Ms. Bennagen recommends that the EGF's guidelines for damage assessment be modified to provide a more objective base for determining compensation.

REECS' report just completed will be show-cased at a number of government and NGO seminars in coming months. It has also been shared with researchers investigating a similar mining disaster near the Donana National Park in Spain. The methods and findings from this study could therefore prove useful, not only for the Philippines, but world-wide.

November 1998

The full text of this study is available as an EEPSEA Research Report:
Estimation of Environmental Damages from Mining Pollution: The Marinduque Island Mining Accident - Ma. Eugenia Bennagan


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Unread postPosted: Tue May 03, 2005 6:09 pm 
From Paradise to Toxic Wasteland: Oxfam Report Exposes a Canadian Mining Company’s Lack of Corporate Accountability in Philippine Island Mining Disaster
- by Oxfam Australia

Ottawa, March 15, 2005 – “Our report tells how Placer Dome Inc. of Vancouver, built a million dollar mining operation on the tiny Philippine island of Marinduque and then abandoned it, leaving behind a toxic legacy that threatens lives today. We want Placer to take responsibility, clean up its waste and pay up what it owes,” says Oxfam’s Mining Ombudsman, Ingrid Macdonald.

For 16 years the Marcopper Mine spewed toxic waste into a shallow bay, filling it with 200 million tons of tailings. When exposed to ocean breezes, the tailings become airborne and land on rice fields, in open wells, and on village homes. Locals call this “their snow from Canada”. This “snow storm” has forced 59 children to undergo traumatic lead detoxification in Manila. Unfortunately, at least three children have died from heavy metal poisoning. In the last 15 years a dam collapsed, then later a mine drainage tunnel burst. More lives, homes and livelihoods were lost. Although the mine closed in 1996, the remaining mine structures are so decayed they pose an immediate threat to the communities downstream.

Oxfam, an international development and humanitarian aid agency with projects in the Philippines was approached by Marinduque community members for help. Oxfam Australia’s Mining Ombudsman took their case and launches her report today detailing the mine’s impact on the island’s communities and environment. The report calls on Placer Dome to complete an environmental clean-up, adequately compensate affected communities, and take steps to prevent future disasters. The report updates similar findings made by the United States Geological Survey in July of 2004.

Taking responsibility for its legacy is one of the major issues facing the mining industry. “I lived with the fishing families and witnessed the mine waste pumping into Calancan Bay 24 hours a day. I saw them lose their livelihood and their health”, says Catherine Coumans of MiningWatch Canada. “As a Canadian, I was never able to explain how a major Canadian mining company could dump its toxic waste, then dump its shares, and walk away from its responsibility.”

“This is a clear case of a Canadian company operating abroad with impunity. Placer Dome would not have gotten away with their actions if they had been operating on Canadian soil. We must take action so that Canadian companies cannot do abroad what they can no longer do at home,” said Ed Broadbent, MP, who is in the process of drafting a proposal to the Sub-Committee of Human Rights and International Development that would ultimately internationalize the criminal code provisions of the Westray Bill that was adopted by parliament last year.

Placer Dome is the sixth largest gold mining company in the world and is listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange. Marinduque Island remains one of the poorest provinces in the Philippines.


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 10:41 am 
Seabreeze @ Cantilan.net wrote:

Thank you Guys sa mga information na ijo nahiambit diri. I love reading them pero siguro mas effective con puyde ta mag post nan mga picture mahitungod sa epekto nan MINING. Im sure mas kusog an impact para sa mga viewers nan jaon.

Sanan suggest raw sab ta anay. Puyde man ta siguro mag net meeting jaon dungan ta mag online mgachat ta para mas kaisturyahan nato pagdajaw ini ato mga topic mahitungod sa ato.

I suggest na this coming Saturday April 7, 2005 at 10:00 am to 2:00 pm Philippine Time.

---------------

Tagon-ons you mostly welcome to join us at Cantilan.net at around this time to discuss this delicate issue. However, be aware that we at Cantilan.net are mostly opposed and very vocal in halting this PROPOSED MINING at Caraga region.

Cheers..


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 Post subject: Here I am..
Unread postPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 5:17 pm 
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I am not opposed to mining, but they have to do it in another country where the laws are being followed strictly and properly. The sad thing about this country and its constitution is that, we have very ideal laws and our constitution have been fashioned in a very orderly way but, SAD BUT TRUE---there is really POOR IMPLEMENTATION of these mandates. The people who have been sitting in power are literally and figuratively just sitting still in power. Most, if not all, are just waiting for the big bucks while disregarding the negative repercussions that these mining companies will eventually bring to our community. I have lived most of my life away from Surigao del Sur but I always come back almost every year because it is where my heart finds solace, it will greatly dishearten most of the people if the place will lose its luster...

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Unread postPosted: Fri May 06, 2005 8:39 am 
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taga didto sab @ Cantilan.net shared this link:

WARNING: contains very graphic images!

http://groups.msn.com/ALAMINMAHAL/willm ... lbumlist=2

----------------------

This is the reason why i shifted position and strongly advocated in oppposing the proposed Mining as to have witnessed the agonising suffering of those physically and mentally affected people on TV are even distressing and worrisome. You should have seen those appalling and dreadful condition of pure torment and misery directly in the eyes of the helpless victims, your heart would melt of weary.

Now i really hope, you people would have a clear view of what will happen to your loved ones back home if this proposal eventually takes place. It's not a warning but a glimpse of future occurence!


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 Post subject: current issues
Unread postPosted: Sun May 08, 2005 10:38 am 
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Mmmm,what erudition do I have about this exposition...lemme' see.

Isn't that MINING itself is business? Who benefits these kinds of businesses? Nature is my passion and it reap my heart when one devastates what the nature brings. Well, unless necessary, I won't oppose on any. Come to think of it, from the root word, MINE, prerogatively, not the totality of the community would benefit the sorts. I admit, it provide employments to those couch potatoes, but do their salaries commensurates to their daily needs? Would they be able to send their children to school? And would they able to buy milk for their infants? Have their kids send to physical/medical check ups? Lets not be idealistic, we have to face the here and now scenario. Decent,clean and healthy community, that's what we need more.For our old folks and our children.
It's not like mining is the only resource? Sometimes I blame mining for landslide during heavy rains in Surigao. Well, who am i to speak up my li'l voice, just saying, if I have a choice, I'd rather preserve nature.Initially, we never create nature,who are we to aggravate it? This may sound shallow to those who are business enthusiasts but if ya'll read this missive with your heart, then you may be able to comprehend what thoughts this brings.

Na hala, magbinuotan kita amo?


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 Post subject: current issues
Unread postPosted: Sun May 08, 2005 11:17 am 
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tips if tolerated...heheeh
yadton yanag promiso na politicians,hnaut unta yagbasa kamo nan amo mga blogs
Funds for the following:
DPWH to develop our infrastractures, roads and bridges, i.e. from Tandag to Carcanmadcarlan, libaong pa ba gihapon? Matay dagkoi raba an mga bato makagubaay nan shock absorber nan mga sakyanan.
I-develop nato an ato mga byutipol beaches (malay nato mahimo na resorts),falls and the likes. Kon may ato very reliable roads and transportations,makatabang sab yaon sa development nan ato community. Tourists are able to tour anywhere in Surigao once ma develop na. Yaka libod ako sa Cantilan, kagwapo na. May ila limpyo na pantalan...yadto pa mga pools sa within little mountains, may bagan "station of the cross" sa mala-foresty area. Madayaw, it invites everybody, not just the foreigners, bisan kita mga lumad Surigaonon. Yadto na time under construction pa pero gwapo na gayud. Di pa maka ruin nan nature ta, may trabaho pa an mga lokal na tao, may ma develop pa na mga gagmay na negosyo (self explanatory), wa pay mga masakit tungod sa mga lipa na kemikal,ya develop pa na komunidad....Uno say pamati mo Bons? Klaro na gayud ini....Tan-aw ko kon way magsugod, waray mahitabo sa ato mga Pinoy....An ato tuho kay mga garbo da sa kasagaran...to be famous and known! A status symbol! Known for this and that!...etcetera and etcetera, not concern with the kids dying because of illegalities Filipino's created. Na anhi dakan kay mahanos na mokaon naay ako nan guinamos na may agridolce hasta sili. Sibs ga sugba ako nan pirit homan da mag-alima dayon ako. Hain na adto si Gi-ngot, kay ngadto kita ka ya publing kay mga-on na kita. hehehehe


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Unread postPosted: Sun May 08, 2005 11:51 am 
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well said sigwel.

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Unread postPosted: Tue May 10, 2005 3:46 am 
Those photos tells a thousand words therefore, needless to utter and express anything more, it speaks directly from the heart. And if perhaps this does'nt move you then you're not a human being after all!


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