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 Post subject: HAIR LOSS
Unread postPosted: Fri Apr 30, 2010 4:14 pm 
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What if your hair starts receding? This is one of the many questions that most men have experienced and as much as possible they don’t want it to happen. To some, who has no hair loss hereditary problem, lucky for them. But for me, it had been a big issue that if somebody may notice and would compare my hair than before, I felt agitation starts scattering inside me, like a small birds startled from their grassy hiding place.

On my adolescence stage, though still up to now, among my all male cousins, I can say that I am the most gifted in terms of straight, thick and shiny hair. I could still recall, after having been graduated from a gruelling and rigid ROTC Training Program in college, my classmates and I would had been letting our hair uncut until it gets longer. We do not know what was in our mind then. Perhaps, it was a sign of exploring ourselves or just enjoying the freedom that we had been experiencing from a strict disciplined program of ROTC. But, I was not excused from the undying criticism of my conservative family. Later on, I decided to have it cut.

From then on, I couldn’t remember exactly when my hair problem gets started. All I knew then was, I saw some hair strands on my pillow after rising-up at by bed, in the morning, from a deep slumber. Though baldness runs in our family yet, I never lose hope. I would buy medicine that has been advertised in the market hoping it would restore my crowning glory as it was before. Alas! The healthy hair before seemed to be didn’t come back. No matter what remedies I have been taking. Still, there's no effect. Denial has been strong that it’s so hard to accept. But, I said to myself, “ Let’s stop this crazy thing. There must be other important things to worry about. Who cares? “

I've realized that becoming bald is not an issue nor lessen your personality. It’s a part of life cycle that we must need to go through, be experienced and be accepted. Though, very embarrassing if someone may give comments on you, but as the time passes by, you'll get used to it. Inner personality still matters most beyond anything else. It is a personality that lasts forever.

Worries, no more!


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 Post subject: Re: HAIR LOSS
Unread postPosted: Mon May 03, 2010 1:13 pm 
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pats,

nice one. and all i can say is to quote Don Herold,
"There's one thing about baldness - it's neat!” :-D

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 Post subject: Re: HAIR LOSS
Unread postPosted: Mon May 03, 2010 2:02 pm 
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kampanaryo_spy wrote:
pats,

nice one. and all i can say is to quote Don Herold,
"There's one thing about baldness - it's neat!” :-D


tnx, k-spy. :-)


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 Post subject: Re: HAIR LOSS
Unread postPosted: Tue May 04, 2010 4:44 pm 
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For my friend Pato: Taken a few years ago when he was a Bank Manager assigned in Tandag...With or without the Hair an admirer ni Pato left and right, front and Back....




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Image

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 Post subject: Re: HAIR LOSS
Unread postPosted: Tue May 04, 2010 7:26 pm 
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oso-os,

hahahaha amo dasa kita ini nan mga bitokon pa.


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 Post subject: Re: HAIR LOSS
Unread postPosted: Wed May 05, 2010 12:41 pm 
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Pats,

The incontestable realities of life start to kick in as we age. It may take in different forms. Baldness is one. I must say one that is dreaded by women is the appearance of wrinkles. I am having them now, he he he.

You are right, there are other fishes to fry than worry about getting bald. Let’s graciously welcome diminishing signs of ageing. Though I admit, at first, acceptance didn't come outright. The more ageing effects we have the more we have endured life. As the famous adage states “life is an endurance test”. Your unperturbed attitude towards baldness will enable you to welcome wholly other signs of ageing that are yet to come as you go through life.

I have been watching and reading your posts in a distance. Imminent signs of you become a good writer in the future are apparent. We are lucky to have Kamps as an inspiration and you are certainly one inspired by him. Put to use his mentoring, who knows one day he would be your predecessor. Isn’t it inspiring? Continue posting Pats. Well done!

Cheers to you both!




Below is info about baldness I googgled on the net.

Baldness is the state of lacking hair where it often grows, especially on the head. The most common form of baldness is a progressive hair thinning condition called androgenic alopecia or "male pattern baldness" that occurs in adult male humans and other species. The amount and patterns of baldness can vary greatly; it ranges from male and female pattern alopecia (androgenic alopecia, also called androgenetic alopecia or alopecia androgenetica), alopecia areata, which involves the loss of some of the hair from the head, and alopecia totalis, which involves the loss of all head hair, to the most extreme form, alopecia universalis, which involves the loss of all hair from the head and the body.
Background, cause and incidence
Incidence of pattern baldness varies from population to population based on genetic background, environmental factors do not seem to affect this type of baldness greatly. One large scale study in Maryborough, Victoria, Australia showed the prevalence of mid-frontal hair loss increases with age and affects 57% of women and 73.5% of men aged 80 and over. According to Medem Medical Library's website, male pattern baldness affects roughly 40 million men in the United States. Approximately 25 percent of men begin balding by age 30; two-thirds begin balding by age 60. There is a 4 in 7 chance of getting the baldness gene.
Male pattern is characterized by hair receding from the lateral sides of the forehead, known as "receding hairline". Receding hairlines are usually seen in males above the ages of 20 but can be seen as early as late teens as well.
An additional bald patch may develop on top (vertex). The trigger for this type of baldness (called androgenetic alopecia) is DHT, a powerful sex hormone, body, and facial hair growth promoter that can adversely affect the prostate as well as the hair located on the head.[1]
The mechanism by which DHT accomplishes this is not yet fully understood. In genetically-prone scalps, DHT initiates a process of follicular miniaturization. Through the process of follicular miniaturization, hair shaft width is progressively decreased until scalp hair resembles fragile vellus hair or "peach fuzz" or else becomes non-existent. Onset of hair loss sometimes begins as early as end of puberty, and is mostly genetically determined. Male pattern baldness is classified on the Hamilton-Norwood scale I-VII.
It was previously believed that baldness was inherited from the maternal grandfather. While there is some basis for this belief, both parents contribute to their offspring's likelihood of hair loss. Most likely, inheritance is technically "autosomal dominant with mixed penetrance"[citation needed] (see 'baldness folklore' below)


There are several other kinds of baldness:
• Traction alopecia is most commonly found in people with ponytails or cornrows who pull on their hair with excessive force.
• Trichotillomania is the loss of hair caused by compulsive pulling and bending of the hairs. It tends to occur more in children than in adults. In this condition the hairs are not absent from the scalp but are broken. Where they break near the scalp they cause typical, short, "exclamation mark" hairs.
• Traumas such as chemotherapy, childbirth, major surgery, poisoning, and severe stress may cause a hair loss condition known as telogen effluvium.[2]
• Worrisome hair loss often follows childbirth without causing actual baldness. In this situation, the hair is actually thicker during pregnancy due to increased circulating oestrogens. After the baby is born, the oestrogen levels fall back to normal pre-pregnancy levels and the additional hair foliage drops out. A similar situation occurs in women taking the fertility-stimulating drug clomiphene.
• Iron deficiency is a common cause of thinning of the hair, though frank baldness is not usually seen.
• Radiation to the scalp, as happens when radiotherapy is applied to the head for the treatment of certain cancers there, can cause baldness of the irradiated areas.
• Some mycotic infections can cause massive hair loss.[3]
• Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder also known as "spot baldness" that can result in hair loss ranging from just one location (Alopecia areata monolocularis) to every hair on the entire body (Alopecia areata universalis).
• Localized or diffuse hair loss may also occur in cicatricial alopecia (lupus erythematosus, lichen plano pilaris, folliculitis decalvans, central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, postmenopausal frontal fibrosing alopecia, etc.). Tumours and skin outgrowths also induce localized baldness (sebaceous nevus, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma).
• Hypothyroidism can cause hair loss, typically frontal, and is particularly associated with thinning of the outer third of the eyebrows (syphilis also can cause loss of the outer third of the eyebrows)
• Hyperthyroidism can also cause hair loss, which is parietal rather than frontal.
• Temporary loss of hair can occur in areas where sebaceous cysts are present for considerable duration; normally one to several weeks in
[/color]


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 Post subject: Re: HAIR LOSS
Unread postPosted: Wed May 05, 2010 3:03 pm 
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Insomada wrote:
Pats,

The incontestable realities of life start to kick in as we age. It may take in different forms. Baldness is one. I must say one that is dreaded by women is the appearance of wrinkles. I am having them now, he he he.

You are right, there are other fishes to fry than worry about getting bald. Let’s graciously welcome diminishing signs of ageing. Though I admit, at first, acceptance didn't come outright. The more ageing effects we have the more we have endured life. As the famous adage states “life is an endurance test”. Your unperturbed attitude towards baldness will enable you to welcome wholly other signs of ageing that are yet to come as you go through life.

I have been watching and reading your posts in a distance. Imminent signs of you become a good writer in the future are apparent. We are lucky to have Kamps as an inspiration and you are certainly one inspired by him. Put to use his mentoring, who knows one day he would be your predecessor. Isn’t it inspiring? Continue posting Pats. Well done!

Cheers to you both!




Below is info about baldness I googgled on the net.

Baldness is the state of lacking hair where it often grows, especially on the head. The most common form of baldness is a progressive hair thinning condition called androgenic alopecia or "male pattern baldness" that occurs in adult male humans and other species. The amount and patterns of baldness can vary greatly; it ranges from male and female pattern alopecia (androgenic alopecia, also called androgenetic alopecia or alopecia androgenetica), alopecia areata, which involves the loss of some of the hair from the head, and alopecia totalis, which involves the loss of all head hair, to the most extreme form, alopecia universalis, which involves the loss of all hair from the head and the body.
Background, cause and incidence
Incidence of pattern baldness varies from population to population based on genetic background, environmental factors do not seem to affect this type of baldness greatly. One large scale study in Maryborough, Victoria, Australia showed the prevalence of mid-frontal hair loss increases with age and affects 57% of women and 73.5% of men aged 80 and over. According to Medem Medical Library's website, male pattern baldness affects roughly 40 million men in the United States. Approximately 25 percent of men begin balding by age 30; two-thirds begin balding by age 60. There is a 4 in 7 chance of getting the baldness gene.
Male pattern is characterized by hair receding from the lateral sides of the forehead, known as "receding hairline". Receding hairlines are usually seen in males above the ages of 20 but can be seen as early as late teens as well.
An additional bald patch may develop on top (vertex). The trigger for this type of baldness (called androgenetic alopecia) is DHT, a powerful sex hormone, body, and facial hair growth promoter that can adversely affect the prostate as well as the hair located on the head.[1]
The mechanism by which DHT accomplishes this is not yet fully understood. In genetically-prone scalps, DHT initiates a process of follicular miniaturization. Through the process of follicular miniaturization, hair shaft width is progressively decreased until scalp hair resembles fragile vellus hair or "peach fuzz" or else becomes non-existent. Onset of hair loss sometimes begins as early as end of puberty, and is mostly genetically determined. Male pattern baldness is classified on the Hamilton-Norwood scale I-VII.
It was previously believed that baldness was inherited from the maternal grandfather. While there is some basis for this belief, both parents contribute to their offspring's likelihood of hair loss. Most likely, inheritance is technically "autosomal dominant with mixed penetrance"[citation needed] (see 'baldness folklore' below)


There are several other kinds of baldness:
• Traction alopecia is most commonly found in people with ponytails or cornrows who pull on their hair with excessive force.
• Trichotillomania is the loss of hair caused by compulsive pulling and bending of the hairs. It tends to occur more in children than in adults. In this condition the hairs are not absent from the scalp but are broken. Where they break near the scalp they cause typical, short, "exclamation mark" hairs.
• Traumas such as chemotherapy, childbirth, major surgery, poisoning, and severe stress may cause a hair loss condition known as telogen effluvium.[2]
• Worrisome hair loss often follows childbirth without causing actual baldness. In this situation, the hair is actually thicker during pregnancy due to increased circulating oestrogens. After the baby is born, the oestrogen levels fall back to normal pre-pregnancy levels and the additional hair foliage drops out. A similar situation occurs in women taking the fertility-stimulating drug clomiphene.
• Iron deficiency is a common cause of thinning of the hair, though frank baldness is not usually seen.
• Radiation to the scalp, as happens when radiotherapy is applied to the head for the treatment of certain cancers there, can cause baldness of the irradiated areas.
• Some mycotic infections can cause massive hair loss.[3]
• Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder also known as "spot baldness" that can result in hair loss ranging from just one location (Alopecia areata monolocularis) to every hair on the entire body (Alopecia areata universalis).
• Localized or diffuse hair loss may also occur in cicatricial alopecia (lupus erythematosus, lichen plano pilaris, folliculitis decalvans, central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, postmenopausal frontal fibrosing alopecia, etc.). Tumours and skin outgrowths also induce localized baldness (sebaceous nevus, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma).
• Hypothyroidism can cause hair loss, typically frontal, and is particularly associated with thinning of the outer third of the eyebrows (syphilis also can cause loss of the outer third of the eyebrows)
• Hyperthyroidism can also cause hair loss, which is parietal rather than frontal.
• Temporary loss of hair can occur in areas where sebaceous cysts are present for considerable duration; normally one to several weeks in
[/color]


Hi Mana Insoms,

Salamat.


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 Post subject: Re: HAIR LOSS
Unread postPosted: Wed May 05, 2010 9:40 pm 
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pato wrote:
What if your hair starts receding? This is one of the many questions that most men have experienced and as much as possible they don’t want it to happen.......


Pats,

Not just men, WOMEN too. :(

As you said, worry no more because --- "Bald as the bare mountain tops are bald, with a baldness full of grandeur” is who you are. (Sorry Pats kalimtan ko kon sin-o an ga orihin nan ini na gilaong. :-D

With or without hair, I admire you... just as you are,
Mana Abb

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 Post subject: Re: HAIR LOSS
Unread postPosted: Thu May 06, 2010 8:08 am 
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Pats,

What your Mana Abbs has said is how you are to me too.


Abbs,

You are right, not only men get bald, women too. May yahibaw-an ako na ya bald na. And worse of it is; dili kon head niya an ya bald, but other part of the body na dapat mabuhok sab. Figure it out!


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 Post subject: Re: HAIR LOSS
Unread postPosted: Fri May 07, 2010 8:28 am 
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TO: Mana Abb and Mana Insomada,

Salamat...


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 Post subject: Re: HAIR LOSS
Unread postPosted: Sat May 08, 2010 8:51 pm 
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oso-os wrote:
For my friend Pato: Taken a few years ago when he was a Bank Manager assigned in Tandag...With or without the Hair an admirer ni Pato left and right, front and Back....




Image


..."a few years ago"?? :lol: hala ka-baga-i pa iton imo buhok wangyu...kadali da ma-upos...abay na esep esep terr :p

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